Group Grading, is it Fair? It Can Be…

Teachers will often group students to help teach the collaborative process. I couldn’t agree more with these teachers, but assessing work students produce in groups can be difficult. Understanding how much time a student spent on a task, how challenging was their part to them, what did they do outside of class … ultimately, it is impossible to effectively and fairly answer these questions.

Regan Ross, designer of Civic Mirror, has a simple and effective way of grading group work, giving students the opportunity to take more ownership in learning process. Want to learn how I have incorporated his method? Read on!

Take a group with four students working on a history project. The assignment is worth 100 pts. I score the project by taking the number of students (4) and multiply that by the total possible points for each of them (100 pts), arriving at the number of points the team could have earned (400 pts). This imaginary group now gets a score sheet back with comments and the number of points they earned, in this case 365 pts. The group will need to work together to decide how many points each person earns. They will discuss what each member contributed to the final product. They will need to come to a consensus, and then all sign the sheet.

Broken Down Example:

100 point assignment

4 students

4 x 100 = 400 possible points

Students earn 365 pointsStudents now divide those points up as they feel among the group.

Student Example:

Bob: 95

Heidi: 90

Jim: 80

Hope: 100

This style of grading constantly amazes me by showing just how honest students are about their work. They have a good understanding of who did the work and who didn’t. Once you start this style, students quickly find out they can’t hide. They must all contribute to the group in order for them to all earn an equal share. My students and I have really come to love this style of grading groups. Many students have comment on this being the closest to fair they have ever seen. I am pleased to give them a more authentic grade while giving them a sense of accuracy in their grade. Next time you have a project, give this a try.

 

Download my template here:  Group Grading Sheet

I have made sure it could work for any of your classes. Enjoy

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  1. Game-changing Grading Changes | Teched Up Teacher - […] grade from a group project comes to us from my former Chemistry professor with special thanks to Mike Matera…

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